Fraxinus pennsylvanica

green ash

Oleaceae

wildlife plant   wildlife plant   wildlife plant  


PlantRealFlorida.org

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florida.plantatlas.usf.edu

Use this link to get more info about this plant from the USF Institute for Systematic Botany

Plant Specifics

Form: tree
Life Span: long-lived perennial
Size: Height: 50-80 ft    Width: 30 ft
Fruit Color: fruit color      brown
Phenology: deciduous
Noted for: Interesting foliage

Landscaping

Recommended Uses: Appropriate for edges of lakes and ponds. Will also grow as a shade tree in uplands. Can be used in settings with soil disturbance.
Considerations: Fairly weak and often irregular in shape.
Propagation: Seed
Availability: Native nurseries, Seed
Light: light requirement   light requirement  
Moisture Tolerance:
moisture_bar
Salt Tolerance: Not salt tolerant
Soil or other substrate: Sand, clay, loam
Soil pH Range: alkaline

Ecology

Wildlife:
wildlife plant   wildlife plant   wildlife plant  
Birds consume seed. Larval host for eastern tiger swallowtail (Papilio glaucus), mourning cloak (Nymphalis antiopa), orange sulphur (Colias eurytheme), and viceroy (Limenitis archippus).
Native Habitats: Moist-dry sites. Floodplains and swamps.

Distribution and Planting Zones

Natural Range

USDA Zones:

Map is based on minimum winter temperatures

Suitable to grow in:
   8A,8B,9A,9B

Other

Other Comments: The Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis)is a very destructive wood-boring beetle native to Asia. It was discovered in North America in July 2002, and has become established in Michigan, New York, Ohio and Ontario (Canada). Millions of ash trees have been killed in the northeastern US. Although the borer has not been detected in Florida (Dec. 2011), the presence of ash trees and the ongoing movement of wood, trees and cargo into the state make Florida an area where the beetle could potentially become established. Your help is needed to detect possible infestations so they can be quickly eradicated...if you see it, contact the Florida Division of Forestry.