Native Plant Communities

Blackwater Stream

Blackwater streams are perennial or intermittent/seasonal watercourses characterized by tea-colored water with a high content of particulate and dissolved organic matter derived from drainage through swamps and marshes.  They generally lack an alluvial floodplain. The term "blackwater" comes from tea-colored, acidic water.

References:

Clewell, A.F. 1986. Natural setting and vegetation of the Florida Panhandle - An account of the environments and plant communities of northern Florida west of the Suwannee River. Report No. COESAM/PDEI-86/001. United States Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, Alabama.

Florida Department of Environmental Protection. 1992. Soil and Water Relationships of Florida's Ecological Communities http://www.dep.state.fl.us/water/wetlands/delineation/docs/soil-and-water.pdf

Florida Natural Areas Inventory (FNAI). 2010. Guide to the natural communities of Florida: 2010 edition. Florida Natural Areas Inventory, Tallahassee, FL. http://fnai.org/naturalcommguide.cfm

Myers, R.L. and J.J. Ewel (eds.). 1990. Ecosystems of Florida University of Central Florida Press: Orlando.

Simons, R.W. 1990. Terrestrial and freshwater habitats. Pages 99-157 in S.H. Wolfe, editor. An ecological characterization of the Florida Springs Coast: Pithlachascotee to Waccasassa Rivers. Biological Report 90(21). United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, DC.

Whitney, E.N., D. B. Means, A. Rudloe. 2004. Priceless Florida: Natural Ecosystems and Native Species. Pineapple Press.

Date Updated 2020-05-17 11:52:01

resources/native-plant-communities/blackwater_stream_FisheatingCr.jpg

Fisheating Creek in Glades County.  Photo by Shirley Denton.

resources/native-plant-communities/arbuckle_creek_small.jpg

Arbuckle Creek just downstream of Arbuckle Lake, Polk County.  Image by Shirley Denton.

resources/native-plant-communities/river_Hillsborough500x375.jpg

Hillsborough River in mid-winter.  Photo by Shirley Denton.