Stachytarpheta jamaicensis

Photo by Marjorie Shropshire. Photograph belongs to the photographer who allows use for FNPS purposes only. Please contact the photographer for all other uses.

Natural Range in Florida
USDA Zones

Suitable to grow in:
10A 10B 11 9B 

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Blue Porterweed, Joee

Verbenaceae

Plant Specifics

Size:0.5-1 ft tall by 3-4 ft wide
Life Span:Short-lived perennial
Flower Color:Blue,purple
Phenology:Evergreen. Blooms more-or-less all year.
Habitats:Coastal strand, open areas in dry mesic hardwood forests, sometimes nestled under trees along sandy roadsides.

Landscaping

Recommended Uses:Groundcover or in a meadow.
Light: Full Sun,  Part Shade
Moisture Tolerance:
always floodedextremely dry
Moisture Tolerance: Somewhat moist, no flooding ----- to ----- Very long very dry periods
Salt Water Flooding Tolerance:Tolerant of occasional/brief inundation such as can occur in storm surges.
Salt Spray Tolerance:Moderate. Tolerant of salty wind and may get some salt spray. Exposure to salt spray would be uncommon (major storms).
Soil/Substrate:Lime rock, Sand

Wildlife

humminbirdcaterpillarbutterfly

Attracts  hummingbirds.

Larval host for tropical buckeye (Junonia genoveva) butterfly. 

Nectar plant for many butterflies and moths including: Bahamian swallowtail (Papilio andraemon), clouded skipper (Lerema accius), Cuban crescent (Phyciodes frisia), Dorantes longtail (Urbanus dorantes), fiery skipper (Hylephila phyleus), great southern white (Ascia monuste), gulf fritillary (Agraulis vanillae), julia (Dryas iulia), large orange sulphur (Phoebis agarithe), little yellow (Eurema lisa), long-tailed skipper (Urbanus proteus), lyside skipper (Kricogonia lyside), Meske's skipper (Hesperia meskei), Palatka skipper (Euphyes pilatka), red admiral (Vanessa atalanta), Schaus' swallowtail (Papilio aristodemus ponceanus), swarthy skipper (Nastra lherminier), tropical checkered-skipper (Pyrgus oileus) and variegated fritillary (Euptoieta claudia) (IRC)

Used by bees including Bombus pensylvanicus (Deyrup et al. 2002).