Quercus hemispherica

diamond oak, sand laurel oak, upland laurel oak

Fagaceae

wildlife plant   wildlife plant  


PlantRealFlorida.org

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florida.plantatlas.usf.edu

Use this link to get more info about this plant from the USF Institute for Systematic Botany

Plant Specifics

Form: tree
Life Span: long-lived perennial
Size: Height: 100 ft
Fruit Color: fruit color      brown
Phenology: deciduous

Landscaping

Recommended Uses: Shade tree where fast growth is needed. Tardily deciduous.
Considerations: Do not plant overly close to foundations. Also be aware that this is not one of the stronger or longer lived oaks--not wind-resistant as most other oaks. Lives approximately 50 years.
Propagation: Seed
Availability: Big box stores, Quality nurseries, Native nurseries, FNPS plant sales, Seed
Light: light requirement   light requirement  
Moisture Tolerance:
moisture_bar
Salt Tolerance: Not salt tolerant
Soil or other substrate: Sand, clay, loam
Soil pH Range: Adaptable

Ecology

Wildlife:
wildlife plant   wildlife plant  
  • Produces acorns that are used by rodents, including squirrels, and other mammals
  • Acorns used by woodpeckers, jays, and wild turkeys
  • Larval host for several moth species
  • Used for cover and nesting by a variety of bird species
Native Habitats: Dry flatwoods with fire exclusion, disturbed uplands.

Distribution and Planting Zones

Natural Range in Florida

USDA Zones:

USDA zones are based on minimum winter temperatures

Suitable to grow in:
   

Other Comments:

There is considerable argument among taxonomists as to whether this is distinguishable from Quercus laurifolia, swamp laurel oak. Even if they are one species, this would be a ecotype that is more suited to drier settings.