Achillea millefolium

Common Yarrow

Asteraceae (Compositae)

Plant Specifics

Form:Flower
Life Span:Short-lived perennial
Flower Color:White
Fruit Color:Brown
Phenology:Evergreen
Noted for:Showy flowers, Interesting foliage

Landscaping

Recommended Uses:Informal plantings, especially butterfly gardens. Useful for erosion control.
Considerations:In Florida, basal leaves are typically visible during the winter.
Propagation:Seed. Clumps of roots can be divided.
Availability:Seed
Light: Full Sun,  Part Shade
Moisture Tolerance:
always floodedextremely dry
 (Usually moist, occasional inundation ----- to ----- Short very dry periods)
Moisture Tolerance: Usually moist, occasional inundation ----- to ----- Short very dry periods
Salt Water Flooding Tolerance:Not salt tolerant of inundation by salty or brackish water.
Salt Spray/ Salty Soil Tolerance:Low/no tolerance of salty wind or direct salt spray
Soil or other substrate:Clay, Loam, Sand
Soil pH:Broadly tolerant

Ecology

Wildlife:
 

Several cavity-nesting birds use yarrow to line their nests. Adding yarrow to nests may inhibit the growth of parasites. Some small birds eat the seeds.

Insects:
   

Attracts butterflies, bees, and other insect pollinators. Attracts bees and butterflies. Larval host for Painted Lady butterfly (Vanessa cardui).

Native Habitats:Ruderal.

Distribution and Planting Zones

Natural Range in Florida
USDA Zones

Suitable to grow in:
10B 8A 8B 

USDA zones are based on minimum winter temperatures

Comments

Ethnobotany:Once used as a food; very popular as a vegetable in the seventeenth century. The younger leaves are said to be a pleasant leaf vegetable when cooked as spinach, or in a soup. Leaves can also be dried and used as a herb in cooking.
General Comments:

Can be grown as a groundcover.

This is a species on the southern limits of its range in North Florida.  Its known occurrence (ISB 2020) is sparse in FLorida.