Halesia carolina

Little Silverbell, Carolina Silverbell

Styracaceae

Plant Specifics

Form:Tree
Life Span:Long-lived perennial
Flower Color:White
Fruit Color:NA
Phenology:Deciduous
Noted for:Interesting bark, Showy flowers

Landscaping

Recommended Uses:Grow as an understory tree in a mixed or deciduous woodland. It blooms in early spring as the leaves appear and is more dainty than H. diptera. Does well when planted in association with Ericacious plants such as azaleas.
Propagation:Cuttings or seed. Said to be best transplanted with its roots balled.
Availability:Friends, Seed
Light: Part Shade,  Shade
Moisture Tolerance:
always floodedextremely dry
 (Usually moist, occasional inundation ----- to ----- Short very dry periods)
Moisture Tolerance: Usually moist, occasional inundation ----- to ----- Short very dry periods
Salt Water Flooding Tolerance:Not salt tolerant of inundation by salty or brackish water.
Salt Spray/ Salty Soil Tolerance:Low/no tolerance of salty wind or direct salt spray
Soil or other substrate:Loam, Organic material (muck), Sand
Soil pH:Acidic

Ecology

Wildlife:

Larval host for various moths including the Promethea Moth (Callosamia promethea),  Canadian Melanolophia (Melanolophia canadaria), and Stinging Rose Caterpillar (Parasa indetermina).  Among vertebrate animals, tree squirrels occasionally eat the immature fruits and possibly  seeds.

Insects:
  

Larval host for various moths including the Promethea Moth (Callosamia promethea),  Canadian Melanolophia (Melanolophia canadaria), and Stinging Rose Caterpillar (Parasa indetermina). 

Attracts primarily honeybees, bumblebees, and probably other long-tongued bees.

Native Habitats:Bluffs, hammocks, floodplain forests.

Distribution and Planting Zones

Natural Range in Florida
USDA Zones

Suitable to grow in:
8A 8B 9A 

USDA zones are based on minimum winter temperatures

Comments

General Comments:Grown less frequently than H. diptera but worthy of planting.