Morella cerifera

Wax Myrtle

MYRICACEAE

Also known as Myrica cerifera

Plant Specifics

Form:Shrub
Life Span:Long-lived perennial
Flower Color:NA
Fruit Color:White,green
Phenology:Evergreen
Noted for:Hurricane wind resistance

Landscaping

Recommended Uses:

Good as a background or hedge plant that also attracts wildlife.

Propagation:

Dioecious (separate male and female plants). Easily planted from seed or cuttings.

Availability:Native nurseries, FNPS plant sales, Specialty providers
Light: Full Sun,  Part Shade
Moisture Tolerance:
always floodedextremely dry
 (Stays Wet ----- to ----- Somewhat long very dry periods)
Moisture Tolerance: Stays Wet ----- to ----- Somewhat long very dry periods
Salt Water Flooding Tolerance:Not salt tolerant of inundation by salty or brackish water.
Salt Spray/ Salty Soil Tolerance:Moderate. Tolerant of salty wind and may get some salt spray. Exposure to salt spray would be uncommon (major storms).
Soil or other substrate:Humus (organic, upland), Loam, Lime rock, Sand
Soil pH:

Ecology

Wildlife:
 

Good wildlife cover. Seeds eaten by birds. 

Insects:
 

Larval host for banded hairstreak (Satyrium calanus) and red-banded hairstreak (Calycopis cecrops)butterflies.

Native Habitats:

Wet-dry sites. Upland mixed forest, floodplains, wetland edges, cutthroat seeps, old fields, scrub, fencerows, etc.

Distribution and Planting Zones

Natural Range in Florida
USDA Zones

Suitable to grow in:
10A 10B 11 8A 8B 9A 9B 

USDA zones are based on minimum winter temperatures

Comments

Ethnobotany:

Interesting smell to the foliage. Candles were sometimes made using the wax that covers the seeds.

General Comments:There is a natural dwarf form that is associated with xeric uplands.  I makes a nice, low-growing shrub in casual gardens.